Book Blogger Hop #48


Click the image above to know what this is about! It’s fun!

This week question:

Why did you start a book blog? (submitted by Julie @ JadeSky)

My answer:

OMG I don’t remember… maybe because I didn’t know what to write anymore in this blog, it was a graphic blog but then I didn’t have any time to  make new graphic and tutorial so it died down a bit. But then, since I read a lot I said why not? So I’m trying. And then I found out book challenges.

2022 Cloak and Dagger Challenge

Fifth year in a raw that I join the Cloak and Dagger Reading Challenge. Carol is hosting the challenge again this year.

I’m going to read at least 5 books and become an Amateur sleuth of course I will try to read more and arrive at least at the end of the spectrum (5-15 books).

I will update this post with the links to my reviews when they are published.

I need to remember to use #CloakDaggerChal tag when posting this year, too… And I need to remember the monthly link-ups.

Books Read:

 

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A Morbid Taste for Bones

A Morbid Taste for Bones
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, Book # 1
Grand Central Publishing
1977
Paperback
197
English
November 6, 2021 November 8, 2021
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In the remote Welsh mountain village of Gwytherin lies the grave of Saint Winifred. Now, in 1137, the ambitious head of Shrewsbury Abbey has decided to acquire the sacred remains for his Benedictine order. Native Welshman Brother Cadfael is sent on the expedition to translate and finds the rustic villagers of Gwytherin passionately divided by the Benedictine's offer for the saint's relics. Canny, wise, and all too wordly, he isn't surprised when this taste for bones leads to bloody murder.

The leading opponent to moving the grave has been shot dead with a mysterious arrow, and some say Winifred herself held the bow. Brother Cadfael knows a carnal hand did the killing. But he doesn't know that his plan to unearth a murderer may dig up a case of love and justice...where the wages of sin may be scandal or Cadfael's own ruin.


About the book

Shrewsbury. During a session between monks, one of them gets sick. When he comes to, the monk who cured him believes he has seen Santa Winnifred telling him to take the sick man to a spring. Columbanus, the sick man, recovers and says that the Saint wants to be transported to the abbey. Six of them leave to unearth the saint, but not everyone in the small town where Winnifred is buried wants the translation. And then, he dies. Father Cadfael investigates.

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La neve di Yuzawa (The Snow of Yuzawa)

La neve di Yuzawa. Immagini dal Giappone
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,
Einaudi
March 30th 2021
eBook
314
Italian
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October 31, 2021 November 2, 2021

An evocative journey that from the districts of Tokyo reaches the most remote places in Japan, to discover authors from the most diverse eras: from the court lady Murasaki Shikibu, author of the Genji monogatari, against the background of the twin cedars of Mount Hatsuse, to the iconoclast Shibusawa Tatsuhiko, with its corner of the Six Paths, in Kyoto, where the well that leads to the underworld is hidden. And then of course Mishima Yukio, Kawabata Yasunari and Tsushima Yuko, who summarize the contradictions of the century that has just ended, and the poets of the last decades. Twenty-eight stages that touch both the places made famous by a literary quote, and others less known: the pond inside the University of Tokyo described by Natsume Soseki, the underground bar in Shinjuku made famous by Murakami Haruki, the extreme edge of the Ryukyu , Hiroshima risen from its ashes, the island of Sado refuge of the crested ibis… The constant intertwining of history, contemporary reality and the resulting poetic and literary representation gives rise to an original cultural geography of a civilization with inimitable characters.


About the book

The book is about some Japanese places which are the main location of other literal works or places where certain tales were written. All seasoned with long philosophical digressions on the authors. At the end, the author talks about writers and their works.

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